Monday, May 01, 2017

Worth a Look

Here are a few posts from last week's Greenpage that might be worth your time...

NEA study explains financial effect of the arts nationally — and California's huge cultural economy

LA Times: Data released Wednesday by the National Endowment for the Arts, in a joint effort with the Bureau of Economic Analysis, offers an argument for keeping arts funding alive at a time when the Trump administration seeks to eliminate the NEA altogether.

Women to Watch: Highlighting Powerful Women in the Production Industry The production industry is always changing, from new ways to film to new technology, with so many women spearheading new initiatives that continue to change the industry. We are thrilled to present a few of our favorite "Women to Watch" -- women who are constantly inspiring and reaching new ceilings in an industry that was previously male-dominated. Check back frequently as we add to this amazing list of women throughout Women's History Month, and place your own suggestions in the comments below.

Analysis: New Canadian Softwood Tariffs May Have Limited Impact

Remodeling | Framing, Lumber, Lumberyards: The U.S. government's imposition of 20% countervailing duties will anger builders and delight dealers by helping prop up current prices, but it's unlikely to lead to any new surge in the cost of softwood because traders have factored the duties into their prices for months.

Why Decolonization Means The Possible End Of Shakespeare In South Africa's Schools

The Theatre Times: South Africa’s education authorities are reviewing the school curriculum. Basic Education Minister Angie Motshekga has confirmed that the review will feature a focus on “decolonization,” reflecting the need to move towards the use of more African and South African novels, drama, and poetry. This might spell the end of William Shakespeare in the country’s classrooms. The Conversation Africa’s education editor Natasha Joseph asked Professor Chris Thurman about the implications of the proposed review.

Turning the NFL draft into grand theater, with Philadelphia as the stage "Standing on those steps and seeing that this is such a heroic moment, this is a culmination for these [draft picks], we set out on, 'Could we create a theater? Could we build a theater here?' " said Peter O'Reilly, the NFL's senior vice president of events.

"We know it's going to be complicated. We know it's going to be audacious. But this is what we have to do, and the Parkway itself was natural. It's a home to so many iconic events over the years."

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